Show Us Your BRAINs! Photo & Video Contest

Evolutionary change in hippocampus and brain structure

This video shows the evolutionary change in hippocampus and brain structure shown from human back to mouse.

Show Us Your BRAINs! Photo & Video Contest

3D 7T Perfusion fMRI

In this study, we introduced a novel zoomed 3D pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) technique at 7T with high spatial resolution (1-mm isotropic) and sensitivity to characterize layer-dependent resting and task activation induced perfusion activity in the human motor cortex. For the first time, multi-delay pCASL was applied to measure variations of arterial transit time (ATT) and resting state CBF across cortical layers, illustrating... more »

Submission Type Video

Show Us Your BRAINs! Photo & Video Contest

Neverland Vein

In a woman presenting with small centrum semiovale hemorrhage, arterial DSA with rotational angiography revealed no evidence of aneurysm or AVM. Rather, it showed a large developmental venous anomaly and, for better visualization, a venous 3D DSA was also obtained. The 2 subtracted volumes were then fused to show concomitant representation of the arteries and veins. Developmental venous anomaly is an embryologically arrested... more »

Submission Type Video

Show Us Your BRAINs! Photo & Video Contest

Inner Brain, with Lenticulostriate artery branches

This visualization depicts lenticulostriate arteries (LSAs), which are very small blood vessels in the brain. The data was collected by a ultra-high field 7Tesla MRI scanner. Visualizing these vessels using non-invasive MRI scans can help advance the study and treatment of cerebral small vessel disease.

Show Us Your BRAINs! Photo & Video Contest

Corticostriatal neurons of mouse anterior cingulate cortex

These neurons were labeled with dG-RV-4eGFP (courtesy of Ian Wickersham's lab) injected into the dorsomedial caudoputamen, which retrogradely infected this population in the ACAd causing them to express green fluorescent protein. This image was captured in a sagittal section, and since these neurons have an orientation perpendicular to the sagittal plane, we are viewing them from below, which is a unique perspective for... more »

Show Us Your BRAINs! Photo & Video Contest

Axonal processes in the larval zebrafish brain

3D reconstruction acquired using confocal microscopy. Dorsal habenular neurons express mCherry (magenta). Neurons producing Relaxin-3 neuropeptide express GFP (green).

Show Us Your BRAINs! Photo & Video Contest

Evaluating Meninges during Migraine Attack: Biobot Live Feed

This image was created with confocal microscopy, FIJI processing, Blender rendering, and Photoshop (to produce Biobot nanoship). Rat meningeal tissue was labeled with antibodies against proteins involved in chronic migraine headaches. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, red), and CGRP receptor proteins, receptor activity modifying protein 1 (RAMP1, blue) and calcitonin-like receptor (CLR, green). Geometry of meningeal... more »

Show Us Your BRAINs! Photo & Video Contest

Fabricated Rhythm

Slit scan of (top) hippocampal waves measured by multi-electrode array blow virtual flags (data: Buzsaki lab) and (bottom) wind blows real flags filmed on a San Francisco pier.

Submission Type Photo

Show Us Your BRAINs! Photo & Video Contest

Kuhl Cells

A Kuhl cell is a synthetic, excitable cell that can be activated by brief pulses of blue light and serves as a platform for screening the next generation of bio-sensors. In this live cell system, blue light activates an adenylyl cyclase enzyme (bPAC) that increases intracellular cAMP. In Kuhl cells bPAC creates a pseudo action potential in HEK293 cells with Kir2.1, NavD, and CNG channels. The behavior of HCN2 was visually... more »

Submission Type Video

Brain Connectivity Workshop Series

Intact, ultrastructure-quality human brain bank

The ultimate goal of neuroscience is to understand precisely how the dynamics of the brain's neuronal networks gives rise to intelligence and mind. Every neuroscientist knows how difficult it has been to make significant progress toward that goal. But why has it been so difficult? A century of dedicated neuroscience research has already identified most of the key structures and molecules which determine brain function... more »

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Brain Connectivity Workshop Series

Has evolution conserved canonical computing microcircuitry?

Has evolution conserved microcircuitry that performs a small number of identifiable, verifiable canonical computations?

If so, connectomes can add value not by their completeness, but by their presentation of motifs which can be categorized as one of a number of basis functions. In spite of the ongoing, global, development of connectomes, we incompletely understand these general and reductionist questions:

Exactly what... more »

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Brain Connectivity Workshop Series

Discover the missing link in the connectome

When we say we don't understand how the brain works, what we mean is that we don't understand how the brain generates its most important and unique function - first-person inner sensations of different higher brain functions (such as memory and perception) within it (that we call "mind"). Now the question is, "How to understand the connectome that provides this function?" At this point, we can proceed in two ways. First... more »

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